Doubting gender. Or why it is best to leave certain questions unanswered

Kristin Hübner, is a PhD student at the Department of Sociology at the University of Warwick.

Kristin Hubner

Her piece ‘Doubting gender. Or why it is best to leave certain questions unanswered’ finished in the top 10 of the ESRC’s writing competition, The World in 2065– in collaboration with academic publishers, SAGE.  

“Any social scientist who tries to predict the future should be regarded with healthy distrust”, I was told by my professor during one of my first sociology lectures which, ironically, dealt with the subject of social change. If this quote is to be believed, then the following paragraphs can only be understood as a work of fiction. Confronted with the choice between dystopia and utopia I chose the latter, believing and hoping that constructions of reality can eventually create a tangible reality.

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One Morning in 2065…

Matjaz Vidmar is a postgraduate research student in The Institute for the Study of Science, Technology and Innovation; part of Science, Technology and Innovation Studies Subject Group in the School of Social and Political Science and Entrepreneurship and Innovation Group of Business School; at The University of Edinburgh

His main area of research is acceleration of business incubation and development of Space Sector in the UK and specifically in Scotland.

Matjaz Vidmar

His piece ‘One Morning in 2065…’ finished in the top 10 of the ESRC’s writing competition, The World in 2065– in collaboration with academic publishers, SAGE.  You can read it below:

One Morning in 2065…

‘Beep, beep, beep…The alarm goes off ringing – my personal assistant, Thor, is scheduled to wake me up as ever for 7.30am. Would be easy to hit the red button now, kill Thor off, and enjoy some more peaceful slumber next to my wife, but I knew it was not to be.’

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After ‘posh and white’: the 50-year slog towards achieving educational equality

Elizabeth Houghton is a PhD student at Lancaster University.

Her research aims to address a gap in the literature on ‘marketised’ higher education  by examining students’ experiences of universities operating under neoliberal policies.

Elizabeth Houghton

Her piece ‘After “posh and white”: the 50-year slog towards achieving educational equality’ finished in the top 10 of the ESRC’s writing competition, The World in 2065– in collaboration with academic publishers, SAGE.  You can read it below:

On a summer’s day in 2015, in a small lecture theatre in London, a primary school student turned to his audience and said: “When we watch the news we’ve seen how university fees have risen so people from state schools feel like they can’t afford to go. All we see in the media is poshwhite kids going to university.”
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People will soon be at the very heart of lawmaking

Dr Louise Thompson is a lecturer in British Politics at the University of Surrey
Her research focuses on the UK Parliament and particularly looks at parliamentary committees, the legislative process and public engagement with Parliament and the political process. Her wider research interests are in legislative studies, British politics and constitutional reform.

Louise Thompson

Her piece ‘People will soon be at the very heart of lawmaking’ finished in the top 10 of the ESRC’s writing competition, The World in 2065– in collaboration with academic publishers, SAGE.  You can read it below:

People will soon be at the very heart of lawmaking

It’s 1st March 2065. Jenny Brown is tucking her son into bed and thinking about tackling that pile of ironing that’s been sitting around all week. Her iPhone beeps and alerts her to amendment 52 of the Children Bill which has just been proposed by an MP in the House of Commons.

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Navigating private life in a public world

Samuel Miles is a PhD student at Queen’s Mary University of London.

Sam Miles

His piece ‘Navigating private life in a public world’ finished in the top 10 of the ESRC’s writing competition, The World in 2065 – in collaboration with academic publishers, SAGE.  You can read it below:

Navigating private life in a public world

Walking down a city street, you feel a buzz from the phone in your pocket. Looking at the screen, you read a message from the coffee shop on the next block. ‘We’ve got a new batch of that Javanese coffee you said you liked last week. Come and try it now and we’ll upgrade you to a Grande for free!’
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