Using social science data to solve a social housing problem

by Farida Mustafazade

When I graduated from my master’s degree in financial mathematics from University College London, I started working as a research intern at a real estate development company, where I developed an interest in housing data analytics. I soon wanted to be in an environment where I could develop quicker as an analyst. The Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) scheme provided a unique opportunity. Continue reading

Exploring partnership in a changing world

by Savita Willmott

Who contributes to “environmental solutions”? As the evidence for climate change, biodiversity loss and environmental change mounts, researchers and practitioners are increasingly trying to find new ways to motivate public and sector stakeholders to take pro-environmental actions. In order to make sure that public communication campaigns are effective, environmental communicators regularly seek out partnerships to reach audiences, often through working with communities or audience-led organisations. Continue reading

Mental health, academic life and me

by Matt Flinders

There can be little doubt that mental health is a growing global challenge. And it really is a global challenge. Although rapid rises in relation to depression, anxiety, substance misuse, self-harming and eating disorders have been well-documented in many ‘advanced’ and relatively wealthy countries, it has been estimated that over 80% of those suffering from mental health disorders actually live in the Global South where support is rare.

Seen from this perspective the potential role and impact of the social sciences in terms of helping to understand why the mental health of so many nations seems to be fraying and what might be done has never been greater. I’m not suggesting that it is the role of the social sciences to come up with simple answers to complex problems. But I am suggesting that the complexity of the mental health challenge – with its cultural, economic and political dimensions – demands an inter-disciplinary approach with the social sciences at its core. Continue reading

Putting research in its place

by Alex Hulkes

‘Place’ and accessibility, including access to the knowledge and skills found in the UK’s research organisations, are recurrent themes in the UK’s Industrial Strategy. This makes them important, as the strategy is central to how the government sees future investment and growth in the country’s R&D.

Many of the elements of the strategy, such as the drive to increase investment in R&D to 2.4% of UK GDP by 2027, have been uniformly welcomed. But when it comes to deciding the right emphasis and the nature of the interventions required, differing views are apparent. This is no bad thing: for strategies of this kind it really is true that the only thing worse than being talked about is not being talked about. Continue reading

Collaborating to prevent dementia and advance care for people affected by dementia

by James Dixon

It is World Alzheimer’s Day today and with it comes the rather worn question: are we any closer to preventing or curing dementia? Along with the personal struggle that dementia can bring to any family, it’s a worsening issue as the UK’s population ages and places further strain on a brittle social care system. Newspaper headlines about the next miracle prevention for dementia, whether blueberries or black coffee, are often overblown but behind these stories lie pieces of research taking place across the country and the rest of the world. Continue reading