Living and looking for lavatories

Lauren White 150pxLauren White, a student at the ESRC-funded White Rose Doctoral Training Centre, was joint winner of Making Sense of Society, the ESRC’s writing competition 2017 in partnership with SAGE Publishing. This is her winning essay.

 

It may be a turn of the stomach, a nervous flutter, a morning coffee or a sudden, unpredictable rush. You may look for a sign, if you are lucky enough to live in a society where they are readily available. There may or may not be a queue, often depending on the room of your gender. You may look for disabled access, whether you are in a wheelchair or whether you have an invisible illness. You may select a space based on who is there or your perception of the cleanliness. For some, it is an unwritten rule that one cannot go next to another person relieving themselves. What are you looking for? Continue reading

Once more, with feeling: life as bilingual

Whilhelmiina Toivo 150.jpgWilhelmiina Toivo, an ESRC-funded PhD student from the University of Glasgow, was joint winner of Making Sense of Society, the ESRC’s writing competition 2017 in partnership with SAGE Publishing. This is her winning essay.

 

My dad had a rather liberal philosophy of bringing up children, but he would always tell us off for swearing. As a result, I grew up feeling very uncomfortable using swearwords. Continue reading

How to get published: notes from an editor

untitled.pngMila Steele is Publisher at SAGE Publishing, where she leads the research methods textbook programme.

SAGE are partners in this year’s ESRC writing competition, Making Sense of Society. The winner and runners-up will be announced later today, and the shortlisted entrants will enjoy a ‘how to get published’ masterclass presented by Mila. Here she gives a few of her top tips.

Editors tend to love lists, and here are my top five pieces of advice that never go out of date. Continue reading

ESRC writing competition: How to write a winning entry

Martin Ince is a science journalist and president of the Association of British Science Writers. Among his many books are Conversations with Manuel Castells, and the Rough Guide to the Earth. He is a frequent contributor to the ESRC’s own publications.

Martin will be among the judges of Making Sense of Society, the ESRC writing competition 2016-17, in partnership with SAGE Publishing. Here he writes a piece on the kind of content the judges will be looking for as a winner.

The days are long gone when the only people who had to like a thesis were the examiners who could approve or reject it. Academics now need to be able to talk about their research to broad audiences, and in a way that makes its importance and relevance clear to anyone. That’s why ESRC and SAGE, one of the world’s top social science publishers, are encouraging you to do just that, with a competition which will get current and recent ESRC-funded students writing about the significance of their work. Continue reading

A look into the future

Susan Cassell is Policy Manager for Data and Resources at ESRC. She provides support for phase 1 of the ESRC’s investment in Big Data: the Administrative Data Research Network and is also the case officer for two Doctoral Training Centres. She is involved with various working groups across the ESRC.  

Sue Cassell

I’ve just spent half a day with ESRC colleagues looking through the entries to the ESRC-SAGE Writing Competition: The World in 2065.  The aim of the competition was to provide a platform for young academics to share their enthusiasm and vision for social science over the next 50 years, by inviting entrants to answer the question, ‘How will your research or discipline change the world by 2065?’. There were 77 entries to review, each written by an ESRC-funded doctoral student. I was struck by the variety – each a unique take on what social science research will have contributed to the world by 2065. Some authors unleashed their creativity and imagined a future in 2065 that seems more science fiction than fact. Not that any of us know for sure what the future holds.
Continue reading