Taking a stand against bullying: Addressing mental health problems from within

by Louise Arseneault

Many people have childhood memories of being pushed around and being punched by other pupils when we felt you couldn’t retaliate. They may also remember being the topic of nasty rumours or being excluded by others. Unfortunately, being bullied is not an unusual experience, even today.

Similar to maltreatment, bullying involves abusive behaviours where it is more difficult for the victims to defend themselves. But in contrast to maltreatment, these abusive behaviours are perpetrated by others of the same age. The research I have been conducting for the past 15 years – alongside great collaborators – emphasises the importance of moving away from the common perception that bullying is a just an unavoidable part of growing up.

Continue reading

How tall are you? And what’s that in metric? Introducing CLOSER’S ‘harmonised’ dataset

by Rebecca Hardy

Society has never quite come to terms with the change from imperial to metric measurements, particularly when it comes to weight and height. Ask people how tall they are or how much they weigh and you’re likely to get an answer in feet and inches, or stones and pounds. Ask again what that is in metric and more often than not you’ll get a blank look.

Continue reading

Social science research can address the challenges mental health poses for our society

Louise Arseneault 150px.jpgLouise Arseneault, Professor of Developmental Psychology at King’s College London, was appointed to the new role of ESRC Mental Health Leadership Fellow in autumn 2016.

Throughout the three year fellowship, Professor Arseneault will play a vital role in championing the role of the social sciences within mental health research.

This is an exciting time for people involved in mental health research. There hasn’t been such interest around the importance and relevance of mental health in society for a long time. And this is especially exciting for me as the ESRC Mental Health Leadership Fellow. Continue reading

How you can help decide the important societal issues tackled by longitudinal studies

Joe Ellery is an ESRC Policy Manager supporting the council’s strategic interests in Longitudinal and Biosocial, Data and Resources and International Strategy.

Part of his role includes trying to better understand the range and type of international longitudinal and cohort studies, with a view to promoting collaboration with ESRC-funded studies.

joe-ellery

Every once in a while it’s important to take a step back and evaluate whether the path you’re travelling is leading you in a direction towards success. This is no different in the case of the UK’s world-leading longitudinal studies; in particular the ways in which these are funded and supported by the ESRC.

Despite their status as internationally-renowned sources of longitudinal data that span up to 60 years, it’s important to understand the future scientific needs for evidence over the lifecourse, in order to ensure the development of meaningful, robust and impactful research resources: resources as relevant to society as those we currently support. Continue reading

A whole lot of love for longitudinal studies

Josie McGregor is a part time Social Policy student and has been working at ESRC for two and a half years. She is a Policy Officer for ESRC’s world-leading portfolio of longitudinal studies, including the birth cohorts. She also supports ESRC’s knowledge exchange activities in her Junior Investment Manager role for the Social Science Section at the Parliamentary Office for Science and Technology (POST).

Josie

A whole lot of love for longitudinal studies

As a social policy student I am fascinated by the amazing social science research that is done in the UK which informs and influences policy and practice. I am incredibly lucky to be in a role which gives me a first-hand look at the way social science research can have immense positive impacts on our lives. Continue reading