How to live to 100 and tell people about it!

by Teresa McGowan

We are all living longer; since 1850, we’ve gained around 2.5 years of life expectancy per decade and it’s estimated that one in three children born today will live to be 100 years old. In Europe there is one retiree for every four people of working age, by 2060 this is expected to rise to one in two.

In our exhibition, ‘How to get to 100 – and enjoy it’, we ask people to explore how our early years, lifestyle, work and where we live can affect our lifespan. Continue reading

The importance of our social environment in understanding suicidal behaviour

by Duleeka Knipe

Over 800,000 people die by suicide every year – that’s one death every forty seconds. A disproportionate number (76%) of these deaths occur in the world’s poorest countries. Our knowledge of the reasons why people die by suicide in this part of the world is severely limited, but a better understanding is desperately needed given that suicide is a leading cause of death in young people.

A huge barrier to improving our understanding is that we simply did not have good data from low and middle income countries to help us better comprehend this complex behaviour – until now. Continue reading

Discovering diet and exploring eating with UK teenagers

Peter Hovard 150Dr Peter Hovard is currently working as a Behavioural Insights Consultant, and was previously part of the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) team based at NatCen.

As part of the ESRC’s Festival of Social Science 2016, the NDNS team ran an interactive session with a group of teenagers studying AS-level sociology. Here Peter explains how the students got involved and what made the day successful.

Children are not meeting many health targets, with teenagers being the main offenders with unhealthy eating. In fact, using figures from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS), Cancer Research UK calculated that UK teenagers drink enough fizzy drinks to fill a bathtub each year. Continue reading