How to live to 100 and tell people about it!

by Teresa McGowan

We are all living longer; since 1850, we’ve gained around 2.5 years of life expectancy per decade and it’s estimated that one in three children born today will live to be 100 years old. In Europe there is one retiree for every four people of working age, by 2060 this is expected to rise to one in two.

In our exhibition, ‘How to get to 100 – and enjoy it’, we ask people to explore how our early years, lifestyle, work and where we live can affect our lifespan. Continue reading

Understanding dementia: the value of co-research

by Linda Birt

Each year several thousand people with dementia take part in vital research as research participants, yet there are few examples of co-research projects in dementia research.

Co-research means people with experience of the condition work alongside academics in all stages of the research process: co-designing studies and co-creating data and results. In the context of dementia, co-research has the potential to actively involve and empower people with dementia and reduce stigma and feelings of isolation.

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Jane Falkingham: the challenge of an ageing population

Jane Falkingham is Professor of Demography and International Social Policy at the University of Southampton and Director of the ESRC Centre for Population Change, exploring the drivers and consequences of a changing population. Much of her research over the past 20 years has focused on the social policy implications of population ageing and the wellbeing of older people, with her research taking an explicitly life-course approach.

Jane Falkingham

To coincide with the UN’s World Population Day (11 July), here are Jane Falkingham’s reflections on an ageing population – first published in our Outlook at 50 series during our 50th anniversary year in 2015. Continue reading