Exposing the genocide of Myanmar’s Rohingya

Alicia de la Cour Venning, Thomas MacManus and Penny Green are researchers at the International State Crime Initiative. In 2015, they concluded a 12 month study which investigated the historical and ongoing persecution of Myanmar’s Rohingya. Here they write about their work and the effect it has had around the world.

Alicia de la Cour Venning 150

Alicia de la Cour Venning

Tim MacManus 150

Tim MacManus

Penny Green 150

Penny Green

 

 

 

 

 

In October 2015, we warned that the Rohingya were experiencing genocide.

Between October 2014 and March 2015 we conducted fieldwork in Rakhine state, and carried out over 180 interviews with individuals from Rohingya, Rakhine, Kaman, and Maramagyi ethnic groups, as well as international non-governmental organisation (INGO) and UN staff, government officials, local Rakhine civil society leaders, business people and politicians, and Buddhist monks.

Our research concluded that successive Myanmar governments have engaged in systematic repression against the Rohingya since the late 1970s; repression which amounts to genocidal practice. Continue reading

Life behind bars: can prison be better than this?

Anastasia Chamberlen is Assistant Professor in Sociology at the Department of Sociology, University of Warwick and is researching in the fields of prison sociology, feminist criminology and criminal justice.

English and Welsh prisons are undergoing one of their most challenging periods in decades. As I’m writing this piece, news emerges of yet another outbreak of violence in an English prison. This time, it’s the high security HMP Long Lartin in Worcestershire, a prison described by the Ministry of Justice as ‘well-staffed’, which saw 81 prisoners take over a wing, raising once again concerns about safety and order in English carceral institutions.

Continue reading

Time for Parliament to allow for job-sharing MPs?

rosie-campbell 150Rosie Campbell is Professor of Politics at Birkbeck, University of London. She has recently written on what voters want from their parliamentary candidates, attitudes to MPs’ roles, the politics of diversity and gender and voting behaviour. She is the principal investigator of the ESRC-funded Representative Audit of Britain.

sarah childs 150Sarah Childs is Professor of Politics and Gender at Birkbeck, University of London. Her research centres on the theory and practice of women’s representation, gender and political parties, and re-gendering parliaments.

Just because MPs don’t job-share at the moment doesn’t mean they never will. We think it’s worth asking why the practices of flexible working, which have helped many people access to the labour market, don’t yet apply to our democratic institutions.

Continue reading

Biotechnology and the world of tomorrow

Elo Luik - runner up 150Elo Luik, a student at the University of Oxford, was joint runner up in Making Sense of Society, the ESRC’s writing competition 2017 in partnership with SAGE Publishing. This is her essay.

“Look at us! We are creating the world of tomorrow!” exclaims Mike. His words bounce off the walls of the high-tech fertility clinic we are in. Outside, the sun is slowly sinking into the smog of New Delhi’s skyline as the streets fill with commuters. The brutal socioeconomic inequality between the haves and the have-nots of India’s economic miracle is laid bare in rush hour traffic. Shiny luxury cars, taking wealthy businessmen from high-rise offices to palatial homes stop at the traffic lights outside. Beggars approach them, knocking on tinted windows to beg for a fraction of that economic wonder, a share of the spoils of India’s integration into global neoliberal trade systems, so that they can feed their family for the day. Continue reading

How to collaborate with local government – lessons from LARIA

Jasmin 150pxJasmin Fox-Skelly is a freelance science writer based in Cardiff. She writes for publications such as New Scientist, BBC Earth and Sky at Night.

Jasmin recently spoke to academics who attended the LARIA conference in May, asking them about their ‘tips for collaboration’ with local government.

Earlier this year the ESRC funded five academics from UK universities to attend the Local Area Research and Intelligence Association (LARIA) conference.

LARIA is a membership body for analysts and policy officers working in local government across the UK – the city, metropolitan and borough councils that deliver public services to citizens in a particular area. The LARIA annual conference is an opportunity for people working in the public sector (local government, local authorities and councils) to come together and talk about what research they are doing, what challenges they are facing, and share tips and guidance on best practice.

The ESRC-sponsored academics attending the conference were able to learn about how ‘the other side works’ – in other words, what research needs public sector organisations have, what sort of research they do, whether there are any differences or similarities in the way they work, and if there are any opportunities for collaboration. Continue reading